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Variations of Baccarat

Variations of Baccarat

If you are into gambling, American Baccarat must be a familiar term. The object of the game is simple; you need to bet on the winning hand, i.e. the one that has a score closest to 9. American baccarat has only two hands; the “bank” (played by the casino) and the “player” hand. You can bet on either of the hands or you can even bet on a tie before the hands are dealt. The bet should be between the table’s maximum and minimum limits.

Classic baccarat is a similar version of the game with high betting limits; intended only for “High Rollers” so not many people can play it. On the other hand there is also a mini baccarat, which is commonly played, but not commonly found in most casinos.
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Though the American baccarat was the original, there are a few European versions of the game which have become quite common. The differences are; who is allowed to play the role of the bank, drawing rules and a few minor other differences.

Chemin de fer is a European version, mostly played in French Casinos. The object of the game is the same, and the hand values are also determined by the same rules. The main difference is that one of the players has to play as the bank rather than the casino. So you become either the bank or the player, and players wager among themselves. The role of the bank can be declined, which then passes on to the player on the right and the circle continues anti clock wise. The casino plays the role of a dealer overseeing that the rules are being followed. Another variation is that the banker can decide whether to draw the third hand or not.

There are 2 major differences in European baccarat; the player has an option of drawing on 5, and the banker can decide whether to draw the third hand or not like in Chemin de fer. Though in practice, most casinos usually follow the American baccarat rules. If the bet matches the banker’s fund, other players are not allowed to bet. A single player can cover the entire bet of the banker by calling out “banco”.

Other variations include different commission rates, the payouts on tie may vary, and that European casinos use chips for betting instead of real money like in North American casinos.